CIS 111 Introduction to Operating Systems (4cr)

NOTE: This is a preview page of the class syllabus. The due dates are not given. In general, for fall, winter, and spring, units are about a week in length and most assignments are due on Tuesday for most class above 2 credits. In summer, units are only 3-4 days long and the quarter is 6 weeks in length.

≡ Page index:
Contacts / Outcomes / Schedule / Expectations / Policies / Textbook / Faith or Conscience Absences / Accommodations / Technical Support / Grading / Assignments

★ Contacts:

★ Class Outcomes:

By the end of this class, students should be able to:

★ Computer Expectations:

It is expected that the student will have a basic knowledge of the use of a microcomputer and keyboard at 20wpm with precision. This is *NOT* an introduction to basic computer literacy. A basic understanding of and manipulation of the windows interface is expected. In particular, students should know how to use Windows Explorer (or similar) to manipulate (save, copy, delete, move, etc.) files, have access to the Internet, know how to use your browser, fill out Web forms, use email (including attachments), and similar basic Web skills. If you do not feel comfortable with these basic skills, it is recommended that you consider taking CIS 150 Survey of Computing prior to taking this class to build computer literacy and BSTEC 110 for keyboarding.

Please develop a plan "B" in case you have issues with your normal Internet access and related software that might affect your ability to participate in this class. Computer labs area available at all OC campuses. See the Help! link above for locations and hours.

To participate in this class you will need:

★ General Policies:


Ask for help! / Netiquette / WAC - Washington Administrative Code / CID - Class Identification / Assignments / Due dates / Form Confirmations / Monitor Your Progress / Attendance / Late work / Redo work / Withdrawing / Student expectations / Classroom conduct / Academic honesty / Service members / Special requests / Pet Policy / Digital media and Fair Use / Non-Discrimination Statement / Sexual Misconduct


Ask for help! (It is really OK)

If you need assistance or are having problems in this class, please visit with me during my office hour so we can discuss your options. I know being a student, especially a new student, can be challenging, confusing, and frustrating at times. The good news is, you can do it! Don't be afraid to ask me, other students, or any OC staff member for help. Seek out other students to create a learning community where you can mutually support each other. We all have our experiences that might help you and each other. Don't be afraid to ask! The BEST WAY TO CONTACT ME is to use Ask_Mark! from the class Web site. Ask_Mark is where I expect to locate student questions and comments. All other methods will take longer as well as not keep a centralized location for all our correspondence for to assist with documentation. I monitor Ask_Mark throughout the day during the quarter and less on weekends and holidays.

If we need to use email, I will use your Olympic College email account.
"The President's Council has made the decision that all email messages between students and faculty relating to classroom and/or college issues must use their Olympic College email accounts. To that end, all OC students are required to use their OC email account. More information on OC email student accounts can be found at: http://www.olympic.edu/Students/StudentEmail"

Olympic College Tutorial Services provides help to students who need assistance beyond the classroom. A consortium of faculty and staff coordinates the program. Tutoring is provided in a variety of settings for most disciplines of study and takes place in lab/study centers, small groups and occasionally one-on-one. OC Tutorial Services

Netiquette (How to act online)

Taken from the MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching (under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share-Alike License). This class will be based on the following interpretation of netiquette.

Since discussions are instrumental to the success of distance education (Al-Shalchi 2009), it is important that healthy and productive interactive environments are maintained. Otherwise, the repercussions may lead to the general "failure" of the discussion component of the entire course and/or for the remainder of the course. Herein lies the importance of having an established classroom etiquette and/or protocol as well as clearly defined consequences.

Netiquette, or Internet etiquette, is a way of defining professionalism through network communication. Its derivation is based on the merging of the words "network" as well as "etiquette;" and, the concept is closely related to ethics (Scheuermann & Taylor 1997). Netiquette refers to a set of core rules that delineates what should and should not be done with regards to online communication in order to maintain common courtesy (Shea 1994). In other words, in a classroom setting, netiquette deals with the proper decorum in online learning and CMD. For virtual classroom purposes, netiquette deals with the notions of respect, harmony and tolerance often manifested in the tone or function of the interactions (Conrad 2002; Curtis and Lawson 2001; Brown 2001).

Netiquette is a way of defining professionalism through network communication. "The college may impose disciplinary sanctions against a student who commits, or aids, abets, incites, encourages or assists another person to commit, an act(s) of misconduct." Please see WAC 132C-120-065(5) concerning cyber misconduct.

Here are some Student Guidelines for the class:

WAC / Washington Administrative Code for Olympic College

Please review Olympic College's Title 132C WAC policies. The various WACs have been passed by the state of Washington and are Washington State law that govern the behavior of the administration, faculty, and students.

CID / Class Identification

All assignments must have a CID number, name, and assignment name clearly labeled. Please see the Web site for the name of the assignment. If the assignment is a physical multi-page document, it MUST be stapled to be accepted. Stapling your assignment is your responsibility before class. I do not carry a stapler with me nor should you expect one to be available in class. Failure to follow these policies may result in the deduction of points. You can get your CID from the Getting Started page from the Portal page.

Assignments (What you need to do to get a good grade)

By taking this class, you are stating that you will be making appropriate time in your schedule to ensure success and have access to the resources required for this class. Expect to spend 1-2 hours outside of class per unit for every class credit to ensure success. Example: 3 credit class = 5 hours outside of class per unit, 4 credit class = 7 hours outside of class per unit, and 5 credit class = 9 hours outside of class per unit to allow time for your success. Thus, being a full-time student is a full-time job, around 40+ hours per week for class and study time. I understand that for many community college students, attending college is a part of a very busy life. I know many of you work and have families. When I was a graduate student, I worked full-time. As an undergraduate, I worked 20+ hours a week. I also have a family with two teens involved with sports and all the other stuff. I know things can get busy. Remember: You are responsible for your learning. You may be administratively withdrawn from class if you do not demonstrate participation for more than two consecutive units. You are the one who needs to invest the time. Time management is your friend or your foe! Waiting until the evening of the due date to ask a question of an assignment may not be your best approach for success for this class. Start assignments early and be proactive. No assignment will be accepted for grading after the last due date.

Due dates (When is my stuff due?)

Assignments are due on time / date given at the Web site. Paper documents are due at the beginning of class or they will be late. Online postings are due by midnight of the due date or they will be late. You can post assignments any time during the current unit. Please do not wait until the last minute to post due to normal connectivity issues associated with the Internet. All assignments MUST be posted before 11:59pm of the due date listed for a given unit using the appropriate posting for a given assignment. Assignments not posted in the appropriate form for a given unit will not be graded. Any assignment not available at that time will be considered late and WILL NOT BE GRADED. Do not wait until the last minute to complete your assignments and make that your excuse. Place any document in my box or under my door at your own risk. NOTE: Emailed assignments will not be accepted for grading unless specified as part of an assignment or previously approved.

Form Confirmations (It is for your protection!)

When assignments are posted at the Web site, using the form provided, a form confirmation is created. The form confirmation serves several purposes. It shows that your posting was accepted by the system and gives you an opportunity to document the transaction. Since little or no paper is used in the class, your only documentation that you posted an assignment *is* the form confirmation. Please make a copy of your form confirmations, either an electronic copy or printed a copy. Keep them safe in the event of a system failure and/or loss of postings at the class Web site. To date, loss of data is extremely rare but can happen since we are using the Internet for transmitting data. It is strongly recommend that you print out all your form confirmations and place them into a confirmation notebook as your backup. Copies of your confirmations, except exams, can be found My_Points section. If issues do arise, one of the first things I may ask to see is your form confirmation. Without a form confirmation for an assignment, you may receive 0 points for an assignment.

Monitor Your Progress (Don't let grades surprise you!)

You can monitor your unit progress by clicking on My_Points on the site index as well as view what assignments you have posted to the class Web site. I post "Quick Scores" ASAP, usually within 48 hours. A bit more during exams. My goal is to give reasonable feedback to as many students as possible in the shortest time possible. If you have any questions, comments, concerns about an assignment, or would like detailed feedback, please feel free to use Ask_Mark! at the top of most pages.

Attendance (It's your responsibility...)

In general, I do not take attendance for most of my classes. I assume you are an adult and can manage your time. However, if attendance is required by a supporting agency, I am happy to facilitate your request. Please bring me your attendance form on a periodic bases for any signatures, like every other week or as needed, at the end of class. Please do not ask me to sign an attendance form after extended periods of time, like asking for the first time at the end of the quarter or at midterm. It is your responsibility to provide and manage your attendance form and bring it to my attention.

Late work (It happens...)

You will be given a number of "Late Tickets" for you late work. Most assignments will use one Late Ticket per assignment unless noted. Late Tickets MUST be used within two units of the one missed unit. For example, if you wish to use a Late Ticket for an assignment in unit 04, it MUST be posted by the due date of unit 06 for consideration. When you have run out of tickets, no more late work will be accepted. Late Tickets can not be used for Discussions since they are time sensitive. My goal is to be fair to all students and not suggest favoritism based on pre-existing situations. I would suggest you hold on to your Late Tickets as long as possible for real emergencies and not poor time management. The last day to post late work is the last due date of regular class assignments. For most classes, this would be unit 10. Please see Late assignments as a courtesy and not as a right. Late work will be graded at the discretion of the instructor both for points as well as to when the assignment will be graded. The number of "Late Tickets" are listed in the Course Schedule section of the syllabus. Late work maybe extended under very special circumstances in accordance with OC policies, like accessibility needs, with appropriate documentation. One credit classes, like CIS 101 and CIS 114, do not have Late Tickets since all work can be posted at the end of the quarter. Use them wisely!

Redo work (It is that important!)

Occasionally I will suggest that an assignment be redone because it appears that the learning outcomes may not have been met regarding that assignment. If a redo is suggested, a notice will posted in the My_Points section. Redos MUST be completed within two units of the unti offered. Assignments posted within the last four hours of a due date will not be eligible for a redo. You need to resend the requested redo assignment ASAP (days, not weeks) after points are posted for that assignment or the redo will *not* be graded and the grade in My_Points will stand. Please contact me via Ask_Mark for instructions and support. Please see Redo assignments as a courtesy and not as a right. Redo work will be graded at the discretion of the instructor both for points as well as to when the assignment will be graded. The last day to post redo work is the last due date of regular class assignments. For most classes, this would be unit 10.

Withdrawing (What to do if you need to leave the class)

If you wish to withdraw from this course, please file the appropriate paperwork with the Office of Registration and Records and then inform me of your decision. It is your responsibility to contact Registration and Records, otherwise you remain enrolled in the course.
Web link: Office of Registration and Records
Phone: (360) 475-7200 / Email: webreg@olympic.edu

Note: You may be administratively withdrawn from class if you do not demonstrate participation for more than two consecutive units.

Student expectations (Basic academic values)

This class is considered to be a college level class. It is expected that students will be tolerant of others views, be respectful in dealing with others, and use standard English in their communications, both written and verbal. Every employee at Olympic College, me included, take your education very seriously. We see education as a gateway to a better life. We hope you take the same view of your education and the opportunities OC can provide. At the end of the day, you need to make the choices to maximize your learning.

Classroom conduct (How to behave yourself in class)

Disruptive behavior will not be tolerated, see WAC 132C-120-065(3). For online class or online components, please see the Netiquette policies above. For ground classes, please refrain from the following during lecture: talking, inappropriate language, using the computer (mouse or keyboard or printer), cell phones/pagers, guest (including children/OCP 200-06, it's the law), eating, sleeping, or other similar disturbance to the class unless a class code of conduct is in effect. "The college may impose disciplinary sanctions against a student who commits, or aids, abets, incites, encourages or assists another person to commit, an act(s) of misconduct." Your cooperation is appreciated.

Academic honesty (It is a BIG deal in academics!)

No academic dishonesty will be tolerated, see WAC 132C-120-065(1). "Any act of academic dishonesty including, but not limited to, cheating, plagiarism, and fabrication." Evidence of academic dishonesty will result in a forfeiture of points for an assignment. "The college may impose disciplinary sanctions against a student who commits, or aids, abets, incites, encourages or assists another person to commit, an act(s) of misconduct."

Service members (I know you may have special situations)

I will try to work with service members (military, police, fire, and alike) as best possible to complete this class. You must notify me through Ask_Mark before any special accommodations will be made that explains your special situation that may *temporarily* impact your ability to participate in this class. Please note that all assignments are open from the start of the quarter. If you know of an upcoming situation, please take advantage of this opportunity before requesting accommodations.

Special requests (Please document with Ask_Mark!)

All special accommodations MUST be requested through Ask_Mark or OC email to develop a paper trail even if we have a face-to-face conversation. After a conversation, please send me an Ask_Mark or OC email ASAP so I'll have a reminder of what was discussed. Without follow up documentation via Ask_Mark or OC email, please do not hold me accountable for any special requests.

Animal Control Policy (It's OC policy)

"Except as provided herein, no person may bring an animal into a building owned or controlled by the College. This provision shall not apply to or prohibit a service animal as defined under RCW 49.60.040(23) and (24), an animal under the control of a law enforcement officer, or an animal authorized by the College for educational purposes."
Reference: RCW 49.60.040(23) and (24), and 34.05.482 through 494, WAC 132C-10-041

Digital media and Fair Use (It's Federal Law!)

At the end of the quarter, please delete all media (videos, images, documents (like PowerPoints), or other media) used in the class for instructional purposes to be in compliance with Title 17 of the United States Code § 110(2) governing the use of "fair use" of copyrighted materials outside of a classroom setting. Assume all material is copyrighted unless otherwise noted.

Non-Discrimination Statement (We take this seriously at OC)

Olympic College seeks to maintain a learning and working environment that is safe, welcoming, and respectful of the dignity of all members of the campus community. Accordingly, the College prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color, religion, national origin, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, pregnancy, veteran status and all other protected classifications. If you witness or encounter any such discrimination, including sexual harassment, sexual assault, or other sexual misconduct, you are encouraged to report it to the Title IX Officer, Cheryl Nuñez, Vice President for Equity and Inclusion at cnunez@olympic.edu/360-475-7125 or the Equal Employment Opportunity Officer, David Slown, Executive Director for Human Resource Services at dslown@olympic.edu/306-475-7300, who will assist you in connecting with all possible resources. You may also report it online (and anonymously, if you wish) at Report It, OC! or seek confidential counseling from the Counseling Faculty at 360-475-7530. For more information about your options go to Non-Discrimination page at Olympic College.

Sexual Misconduct (and other discrimination and harassment)

Sexual and gender-based harassment, sexual assault, domestic and dating violence, and stalking are prohibited forms of sexual misconduct. If you experience or witness sexual misconduct, you are encouraged to report it to the Title IX Coordinator, Cheryl Nuñez in CSC (Bldg 5), Room. 540; at 360-475-7125; or at cnunez@olympic.edu). All other forms of discrimination and harassment should be reported to the EEO Coordinator, the Associate Vice President of Human Resource Services in CSC (Bldg 5) 5th floor; at 360-475-7300; or at HRS@olympic.edu. You can also report sexual misconduct and other discrimination and harassment online (anonymously, if desired) through OC, Report It! located in the footer of the College website. For confidential support, you can schedule an appointment with one of the Counseling Faculty in HSS (Bldg 4), Room 203; at 360-475-7530; or at CounselFac@olympic.edu.

Note:

Points may be deducted per violation of the policies listed above from your final grade.

★ Text:

Acquiring the correct text is the students responsibility on or before the start of class. Not having a text will not be an acceptable excuse for not being able to participate in class to turn in assignments on time unless there is a textbook acquisition issue with the OC bookstore. If there are no books on the shelf, please consult a staff member and not assume the bookstore is out of textbooks. OC Bookstore Web site (Page will open in a new window.)

★ Faith or Conscience Absences:

Student Absences for Reasons of Faith or Conscience, OC Policy 300-03: Under this Policy, OC students may request absences from classes two (2) days per academic year for reasons of faith or conscience without adverse impact on their grades. A request for absence must be submitted 21 days in advance of the absence or as soon as reasonably possible. Find the required form "Student Absence Form: Reasons of Faith or Conscience" in order to request the absence. Upon verification of the absence, notify instructors so that they may develop adjustments for assignments and tests.

★ Disability and Pregnancy-related Adjustments and Accommodations:

Please contact Access Services with any questions at:

If you need course adaptation or accommodations because of a disability or pregnancy, if you have an emergency medical information, or if you have a accommodations that need to be shared with me in the event that the building needs to be evacuated, please contact me during office hours. If you use an alternative medium for communicating, please let me know before the meeting so that appropriate accommodations can be made.

You must contact me via Ask_Mark! or see me during my office hours concerning your accommodation request(s) so we can discuss your needs before it can be recognized and implemented in class.

Note that about 10% of all OC students have some type of disability, both observable (like the use of a cane) as well as invisible (like PTSD or asperger syndrome). Most disabilities at OC are invisible. As an instructor, I can not disclose a student's disability. The decision to share with others is a choice of the student.

★ Technical Support:

When things go wrong with computing it is never fun, especially when there are due dates and other time sensitive demands. Here are a few contacts and ideas to consider related to technical support:

★ Grading Chart:

There are 500 possible points in this class. A minimum of 300 points are required for a grade. See chart below for details. If your participation in class stops before the sixth week, I will most likely records a score of 'NC'. If your participation in class continues after the sixth week, I will most likely records a score of '0.0' if your points are below 300 points. Please note these are guidelines, not grading policies.

   A          B          C          D
           3.3-435    2.3-380    1.3-330
4.0-475    3.0-420    2.0-365    1.0-315
3.7-455    2.7-400    1.7-350    0.7-300
                                 0.0-299

✔ Assignments:

NOTE: Due dates will be shown on the actual class homepage, unit outline, calendar page, and the syllabus.

Unit 00: What To Do On The First Day!

Welcome to CIS 111 Introduction to Operating Systems! Below are some things to do and think about before you start this class. I'm excited to have you in this class and look forward to assisting you to meet your academic goals. If you have questions or comments, please feel free to use Ask_Mark at the top of most pages. I monitor Ask_Mark throughout the "school" days and less on weekend and holidays.

Meet your instructors

Mark Westlund, MBA-IS (instructor)

Pic of Mark at Safeco Hi. My name is Mark Westlund. I'll be your instructor for this class. I teach Information System Technology at Olympic College. I have an MBA in Information Systems and BS in Telecommunications. I have been teaching at Olympic College for 15+ years. I have been involved with some sort of technology for the past 25+ years, either in communications or computers. I have been developing for the Web since the fall of 1994. I remember getting onto the Internet and using Mosaic (the 1st graphical Web browser) and started surfing that fateful day. I went home many hours later and told my wife that I had experienced the most exciting thing I had ever seen a computer do. I was hooked and have never looked back. Its kinda interesting for me today to look back over my years of experience in broadcasting and working with mainframes, minicomputers, and PCs to see how all of it is now converging onto a Web page. I'm excited everyday to see what is going on with the Web and computers in general. It is totally amazing to see the emergence of new cultures made possible by the Web and how they connect people and places and things. I enjoy spending time with my family. I have a daughter just out of college and a son who is roaming the world and a loving wife. When I have "free time" I enjoy going to the beach with my family, taking long walks, reading, watching mostly foreign films, being a news junky, and listening to classical music. I look forward to assisting you with reaching your academics goals. Please feel free to contact me anytime you have questions or concerns. -Mark

Angela Henderson, MCL (I-BEST support)

Hi everyone, I'm Angela Henderson. I'm teaming with Professor Mark Westlund to bring Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) elements into our course. This means you have added support and mentoring available within this class. The idea is to strengthen students' foundations while simultaneously growing their technical skills. The I-BEST approach improves overall success, be it in the classroom or the workplace. You may reach out to me for individualized assistance in this course. Additionally, you may wish to explore such things as improving study skills, exploring tech certifications, or finding out more about college services. I'm you're resource. Send me a message to set up a time to meet privately over Zoom. I've been teaching part-time at Olympic College since 2012. I've taught courses in marketing, client relations, business English, and communications. I began supporting student success in Computer Information Systems in 2019. I hold a master's degree in Cybersecurity and Leadership (MCL) and a bachelor 's in Business Administration from the University of Washington. I am also CompTIA Certified Security+ and Network+. I look forward to getting to know you better. Reach out to me either through our course shell or my OC faculty email: ahenderson@olympic.edu. Let's make it a great quarter! -Angela

There are NO assignments associated with this unit

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links that are lower on this page)

  1. Check to see if this class is right for you (see below)
  2. Take a few minutes to look over the site and get a feel of where things are and how they work and when assignments are due
  3. Take a few minutes to review the syllabus concerning policies and alike
  4. Understand why there is no textbook for this class
  5. Think about how you would continue with this class if you lost Internet connection for a prolong period of time
  6. Send me an ☎️ Ask_Mark! (see button at the top of most pages) message for 10 points so we know we can communicate, Ask_Mark is the best way to contact me, please include your OC email address and phone number (if you wish, as an alternative way of contacting you)

Unit 01: OS Basics and File Management

This unit will introduce you to the concept of an operating system and the technical basics of file management. Key concepts are that there are many operating systems for many reasons and how users view file management and the difference of how an operating system manages files. The goal: Explain the basics of what an OS is, different types of OSs, and basic file management.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  2. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  3. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  4. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 02: Introduction to the Microsoft Command Line Interface

This unit will introduce you to the Microsoft Command Line Interface. The CLI is based on MS-DOS. Microsoft's first operating system. It is text based. Much of Windows connectivity at the lower levels still relies on DOS based events. The CLI also make Windows backwards compatible with older DOS based programs. The goal of this unit is to make you aware of the existence of the CLI, types of commands, and demonstrate the use of a few common commands with switches. The goal: Introduce what the Windows CLI is, types of CLI commands, and provide an experience with using some basic CLI commands and a little background of the Windows CLI evolution.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Why study command line interfaces?

One of the top skills requested by our advisory board is competency in the command line interface (CLI). We are starting with the core of the Microsoft CLI since that represents the core set of commands needed to manage files and other core features of an operating system needed to make an OS work and be useful at its simplest level. The core CLI commands haven't changed much in more than 35+ years. Newer CLI commands and features, like PowerShell, are based on the basics of CLI from the start of MS-DOS days. Overtime, many other commands and features have been added to the OS. This class, CIS 111 Intro to Operating Systems, is just that, an introduction to Microsoft and Linux operating systems. Since most students no longer use a CLI as their main interface to their computer, this class focused on the basics of the CLI, not the graphical user interface (GUI), like Windows. "The GUI makes computers useful, the CLI makes computing possible." A fair amount of managing computers at a professional level is done through the CLI, not the GUI, since the CLI requires minimal system resources and can be used in a variety of hardware environments since it is text based and does not use pictures and a mouse or touch interface. More advanced commands, like networking commands and the use of PowerShell, are covered in the more advanced networking and other classes. The goal of this class is to familiarize students with the CLI basics of an OS so they can succeed in the CLI to learn more about computing and more powerful commands within the scope of a given area of study, like networking or programming, where the CLI may be the dominant interface. So having a foundation in the MS-DOS or DOS is a great way to learn the basics of the Microsoft CLI we use today. See the links below of other CLI environments like Cisco and Amazon Web Services. You can see that CLI are key environments for modern computing and knowing how to use a CLI will increase your level of proficiency with computers and make you a more valuable employee.

Using the Cisco IOS Command-Line Interface (PDF)
"The Cisco IOS command-line interface (CLI) is the primary user interface used for configuring, monitoring, and maintaining Cisco devices. This user interface allows you to directly and simply execute Cisco IOS commands, whether using a router console or terminal, or using remote access methods."

AWS Command Line Interface
"The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) is a unified tool to manage your AWS services. With just one tool to download and configure, you can control multiple AWS services from the command line and automate them through scripts."

Why The GUI Will Never Kill The Sacred Command Line
"The command line isn’t a crusty, old-fashioned way to interact with a computer, made obsolete by GUIs, but rather a fantastically flexible and powerful way to perform tasks..."

Unit 03: Common MS-DOS Commands

This unit will introduce you to ten basic MS-DOS commands and how to interpret the syntax of most MS-DOS/CLI commands. The key concepts are the different types of commands and how they can also be manipulated with redirection and pipes through the console. The goal: Experience key Window CLI commands for drive, folder, and file management and role of the system console.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 04: Introduction to MS-DOS Batch Files

This unit will introduce you to the concept of a batch file in the CLI and some of the special commands unique to them. The key concept is how batch files can help automated events inside most of Microsoft's operating systems by listing a series of CLI commands in a sequence to produce useful and repeatable work. The goal: Develop an awareness of what a batch file is and have an experience in developing a few simple ones.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 05: User Experience in MS Windows

This unit will introduce you to basic elements of the user experience in Microsoft Window's graphical user interface or GUI. Key concepts covered are ways to enhance the user experience and how the GUI interacts with the CLI to minimize the user's understanding of how the OS is manipulated on their behalf and how all this is made possible by the system Registry. The goal: The purpose of the GUI from a systems point of view, how the user experience is managed, and how Windows is managed by the system Registry.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 06: OS Architecture

This unit will introduce you to operating system architecture and what is managed and the idea that an OS is a collection of services that work together to support the kernel which is the core of the OS. Key concepts that make modern OSs possible are use of multi-tasking and virtual memory and the role of the system shell. The goal: Develop a deeper understanding of how a modern OS works and a awareness of the NT kernel used in most versions of Windows.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 07: Introduction to the Linux Command Line Interface

This unit will introduce you to the basic user features of the Linux command line interface. The goal of this unit is to make you aware of the existence of and purpose of a user account and the CLI in Linux. You will demonstrate the use of a few common Linux commands through a Telnet connection. You will also be introduced to using a Telnet connection to access console services from your Linux account on a remote server over the Internet. The goal: Introduce what the Linux CLI is, connecting to a Linux server using Telnet, and provide an experience with using some basic CLI commands.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 08: Common Bash Commands

This unit will introduce you to basic Bash commands used to manage the Linux environment. The key concepts are the different types of commands and how they can also be manipulated with simple regular expressions. A core concept is the role permissions for files and folders in the Linux environment through the chmod command for the user, their group, and others on the system. The goal: Experience key Linux CLI commands for folder and file management and role of permissions in Linux with simple regular expressions.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 09: Introduction to Vi, Bash Scripts, and FTP

This unit will introduce you to creating and using simple Bash scripts created with the Vi editor and the use FTP to move files between computers. Vi is the online text editor in Linux. Vi allows for remote editing of text files like scripts. A key concept is how scripts can help automated events by listing a series of CLI commands in a sequence to produce useful and repeatable work. FTP will allow files to be downloaded to the local system for editing and then uploaded to remote machine for others to use. The goal: Develop an awareness of what a script is and have an experience in developing a few simple ones with Vi and use of FTP for transporting files.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

Unit 10: Introduction to Virtual Machine (VM)

**Please note that is a new unit for both this class and IT support which manages the virtual machines on our behalf.** This unit will introduce you to the role of a virtual machine (VM) in modern computing as well as what emulators are. The goal: Make you aware of what a virtual machine is and give you an opportunity to experience one. The focus is not to have you go through the process of installing a virtual machine on your computer but to see how one works over a network. Please note that these VMs are not optimized for speed and over an Internet connection there may be some lag as well.

What to do for this unit: (see resources and links, they are lower on this page)

  1. Take a moment to check your points by click on the 📊 My_Points link at the top of most pages
  2. Review the learning Objectives for this unit to get an idea of what to study
  3. Watch the video for an overview of the unit and you may want to print out a copy of the Unit Study Guide to take notes on
  4. Read and review the the Unit Presentation for more details, that includes the embedded and linked pages if not embedded
  5. After you have read and reviewed the unit learning material:

★ NOTE: This document is subject to change.